Your Go-To Guide For Everything COVID-19

Information is plentiful on the internet for just about everything, including COVID-19. When looking for accurate information, typing into the search bar might not cut it. Where should you look for information on COVID-19?

Plot Twist! This post originally appeared on our sister website in 2020 or 2021 and transferred to irishmonarchy.com on 4/4/2022. Some posts may seem to reference a time in our pandemic state that doesn’t fit with life in 2022 – so that’s why! Thank you for checking our posts and always stay tuned for more!

The internet has anything and everything, and even more information than you probably want right at your fingertips. If you’re like most, you start looking for one thing, and a few clicks later are down a rabbit hole of information and forgot what you started to search for in the first place.

Additionally, when researching, you have to search through actual information and opinion. This fact vs. opinion is probably one of the hardest challenges when finding information on the internet.

Remember, when looking for information seek out reliable, independent sources. While other, smaller websites may state their information came from a reliable source, it’s always helpful to check the source yourself.

Also, never attempt to self-diagnose or self-treat at home. If you still have questions, contact your medical provider.

Here is a list of resources on where you can look for the information you need during this COVID-19 pandemic, from goblal to local healthcare systems:

Global and Country Organizations

World Health Organization (WHO): The World Health Organization is part of the United Nations, formed after WWII, and responsible for international public health. Their role includes monitoring public health risks and assistance in coordinating responses to health emergencies, such as pandemics.

United States / Center for Disease Control (CDC): Here in the United States, the CDC is part of the US Dept. of Health and Human Services. Their mission, listed on their website, states:

“CDC works 24/7 to protect America from health, safety and security threats, both foreign and in the U.S. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are chronic or acute, curable or preventable, human error or deliberate attack, CDC fights disease and supports communities and citizens to do the same.”

England/NHS: What are other countries doing during this pandemic? Check the information they are highlighting to their citizens during this pandemic. In England, the National Health Service is the publically funded healthcare system for the country.

State & Local Resources

In the United States, each state has a public health department or agency. These organizations are responsible for monitoring, reporting, and regulating the state health systems to promote health through prevention, control of disease and injury. Within each state, smaller departments may exist at the local level.

For example, Illinois:

Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH): The Illinois Department of Public Health currently has been reporting on COVID-19 daily, and lists a wealth of resources on their website. Check for information related to each county via their websites (ie: Cook County Department of Public Health) to find resources and statistics for specific municipalities.

Find your State here:

Local Healthcare Systems

What hospital would you go to in an emergency? Your answer should be the online resource you look to for answers.

Most importantly, almost all local healthcare hospitals and health systems will have online resources in place to help you get answers.

While we cannot list all healthcare systems, we can highlight some of the resources our state has available.

In the Chicagoland area, we are fortunate to have a wealth of hospitals usually within a short drive. In more rural areas, hospital systems can be further away, but the information should just be a few clicks away.

Here are some examples of Chicagoland and Illinois Health system COVID-19 resources on their websites:

Continue Your Diligence

We are in a fluid environment of information and changes will occur frequently. This is ok, and this is normal. What is new to us is we see the scientists, medical professionals, and health systems communicating and dialoguing in real-time.

Therefore, as more information is available, we will see patterns and trends in the data and have a clearer path to recovery. This won’t take forever, but it will take time.

Most importantly, be sure to keep diligent in social distancing, hand washing, and wearing a mask in public!

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